Made Weekly

a cooking experiment: five recipes, five days, one ingredient
Search results for bok choy
There’s nothing better than making a big stir fry out of all the random produce you have in your fridge before leaving for vacation. First, because it means you’re going on vacation. Second, because it’s delicious. 
This is a segue into me explaining that I am leaving on a jet plane to California, and I’ll be in the woods next week, so there will be no updates until the 17th. I’ll be communing with nature, though, so keep an eye on my Instagram. 
As long as your pantry is stocked with garlic, ginger, and soy sauce, you can pretty much be assured stir fry is within reach. You could top it with some sriracha for heat, and the cashews are a nice touch but not necessary if you don’t have them on hand. 
See you in a week! 

There’s nothing better than making a big stir fry out of all the random produce you have in your fridge before leaving for vacation. First, because it means you’re going on vacation. Second, because it’s delicious. 

This is a segue into me explaining that I am leaving on a jet plane to California, and I’ll be in the woods next week, so there will be no updates until the 17th. I’ll be communing with nature, though, so keep an eye on my Instagram

As long as your pantry is stocked with garlic, ginger, and soy sauce, you can pretty much be assured stir fry is within reach. You could top it with some sriracha for heat, and the cashews are a nice touch but not necessary if you don’t have them on hand. 

See you in a week! 

This is a somewhat traditional combination of elements as far as soup goes, but bok choy isn’t the leafy green you’d ordinarily add in. I like it because it’s tender and has a mild sweetness that kale or mustard greens don’t have. I used a delicious homemade mushroom broth, which added another layer of earthy flavor to the mix. 
I used 1 can of beans, 1 sausage link, 1/2 an onion, 2 cloves of garlic, and 4 cups of broth to make about 3 servings. Add in as much bok choy as the soup can handle! It’s also tasty with some cooked rice added in, if you’ve got any laying around. 

This is a somewhat traditional combination of elements as far as soup goes, but bok choy isn’t the leafy green you’d ordinarily add in. I like it because it’s tender and has a mild sweetness that kale or mustard greens don’t have. I used a delicious homemade mushroom broth, which added another layer of earthy flavor to the mix. 

I used 1 can of beans, 1 sausage link, 1/2 an onion, 2 cloves of garlic, and 4 cups of broth to make about 3 servings. Add in as much bok choy as the soup can handle! It’s also tasty with some cooked rice added in, if you’ve got any laying around. 

Using such strong flavors in a dressing means you hardly have to use any oil — making this a super light, flavorful dressing for the summer. I used about 1 tsp. each of soy sauce and sesame oil, plus the juice and zest of 1/4 of an orange, to make enough dressing for one serving of salad. 
Tatsoi is also from the cabbage family, and it’s started to pop up more and more in grocery stores as pre-packaged greens (at least near me). I’ve seen it referred to as “Chinese spinach,” but apparently it’s also known as “rosette bok choy.” By the looks of it they seem nearly identical! 
Using the baby varieties of these greens means the stems are tender enough to eat raw, and add a nice crunch to the salad.

Using such strong flavors in a dressing means you hardly have to use any oil — making this a super light, flavorful dressing for the summer. I used about 1 tsp. each of soy sauce and sesame oil, plus the juice and zest of 1/4 of an orange, to make enough dressing for one serving of salad. 

Tatsoi is also from the cabbage family, and it’s started to pop up more and more in grocery stores as pre-packaged greens (at least near me). I’ve seen it referred to as “Chinese spinach,” but apparently it’s also known as “rosette bok choy.” By the looks of it they seem nearly identical! 

Using the baby varieties of these greens means the stems are tender enough to eat raw, and add a nice crunch to the salad.

If you love hush puppies, you’ll love these savory pancakes. They’re actually quite light and fluffy, and have just a bit of crunch from the cornmeal. Gussy them up with more herbs and spices, or any other shredded green vegetable. 
I served them here with some spicy mayo, but they’d be amazing at brunch with a poached egg on top too! 

If you love hush puppies, you’ll love these savory pancakes. They’re actually quite light and fluffy, and have just a bit of crunch from the cornmeal. Gussy them up with more herbs and spices, or any other shredded green vegetable. 

I served them here with some spicy mayo, but they’d be amazing at brunch with a poached egg on top too! 

Starting off with a super simple way to prepare bok choy, and indeed one of my go-to preparations for almost any vegetable. Olive oil + salt + 450° oven + a squeeze of lemon. This goes nicely with some salty-sweet-spicy tofu. I’ve been trying to eat greens and protein for lunch instead of relying on bready things to fill me up, so I’m adding this to the rotation! 
Swap the honey for agave, and it’s also totally vegan. 

Starting off with a super simple way to prepare bok choy, and indeed one of my go-to preparations for almost any vegetable. Olive oil + salt + 450° oven + a squeeze of lemon. This goes nicely with some salty-sweet-spicy tofu. I’ve been trying to eat greens and protein for lunch instead of relying on bready things to fill me up, so I’m adding this to the rotation! 

Swap the honey for agave, and it’s also totally vegan. 

Bok Choy 101

Bok choy is a variety of Chinese cabbage that is just recently in season here in New York. Bok Choy in Cantonese literally means “white vegetable,” and although it is a part of the cabbage family, its form is quite different from the typical savoy or napa cabbage varieties . 

Bok choy has a cluster of white stems that become tender, flat green leaves. In cooking, I think it behaves most like chard, although its stems are not as tough.

There are many more varieties of bok choy available in Asia, but here you’ll most often see green baby bok choy and larger bok choy. I have also seen some lovely red bok choy at the market, which has a slightly purple hue on the fronts of its leaves. 

Buying & Preparation: Purchase bok choy that has bright, firm leaves, and wash thoroughly between the tightly packed stems before cooking. Quite a bit of grit can hang out in there. 

Cooking: Bok choy can be eaten raw or cooked, although baby bok choy is best suited for raw preparations. When cooking, it wilts quickly like spinach or other tender greens, and can be stir fried, added to soups, or roasted. 

Because of its Chinese origins, bok choy is most often cooked with Asian flavors like soy, ginger, and garlic. 

Onward, to bok choy week.